Amazing places to eat tapas in Andalusia: Bar El Cura, Trebujena

Tapas in Trebujena    Follow my blog with Bloglovin

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Delicious tapas in Andalusia at Bar El Cura, Trebujena

The white village of Trebujena is perched on the top of a hill overlooking the estuary and surrounded by marshes. It’s not generally on the tourist path, but if, like me, you enjoy excellent tapas, then I recommend adding Trebujena to your go-to-list when eating out in the province of Cadiz.

About 30 minutes from Jerez de la Frontera and 20 minutes’ drive from Sanlucar de Barrameda, Trebujena is a quiet, unassuming and friendly village. If you are in the area in the summer, it’s best to go in the evening as it can get incredibly hot here during the day.

So, where should you go when you get there?

One of the great things about Trebujena is that each bar has its own range of tapas and by that, I mean you won’t find the same standard menu in each one. They all have their own charm and delicious tapas. Whether you choose Bar El Litri, La Escalerita de Ana or Bar El Cura, you won’t be disappointed. While I  recommend all three for their excellent tapas and service, in this post I’m going to tell you about my latest experience in Bar El Cura, which you’ll find in the plaza Antonio Cañada.

What we chose

We came here on the Sunday evening of a busy weekend during the Trebufest; Trebujena’s annual music festival. Knowing how busy they had been all weekend, I was half expecting the kitchen to be closed and the tapas to be of a lower standard than normal. I couldn’t have been more wrong.

gmabas
Seafood salad

The selection of tapas in Bar El Cura is varied and elegant. Whilst most bars in and around Cadiz serve the traditional pescaito frito, (fried fish) El Cura has a menu of original tapas at very reasonable prices. We started the evening with a cold tapa of ‘salpicon’ a seafood salad with tomatoes, pepper, onion and a dressing. Salpicon varies from place to place and the amount of seafood you get can sometimes be outweighed by the salad, but fortunately, El Cura is generous with the seafood.

taleguitas de alcauciles y pata negra
Artichoke parcels with cured ham

Next came the exquisite Taleguitas de alcauciles y patanegra; beautifully wrapped parcels with artichokes and cured ham wrapped in filo pastry and deep fried. Artichokes are commonly known as ‘alcafchofas’ in most parts of Spain, but here in Cadiz they are known by their other name ‘alcauciles’. A deliciously warm mixture of textures and flavours, this tapa won my vote immediately.

We followed this with a dish that still makes my mouth water every time I see the photo. Milhojas de mango, queso de cabra y jamon from the specials board was a tapa I had never tried before. Filo pastry topped with a layer of mango and goats cheese, a slice of cured ham and a tiny drizzle of olive oil on the top. Biting into this was like disappearing into food paradise.

mango, goat's cheese and serrano ham
mango, goat’s cheese and serrano ham

Next came the other half’s choice which, of course, being the more carnivore of the two had to include meat. He ordered magret de pato sobre timbal de patata – duck on a bed of potato. The duck was moist, and the potato melted in my mouth bringing out the wonderful flavour of the duck.

We finished the savoury dishes with another one from the specials board ‘pulpo al horno’ – oven baked octopus. I am not exaggerating when I say that every mouthful of this dish was accompanied by an ‘ooh’ or an ‘mmm’. The dish was served hot and with papas panaderas (potatoes fried and then baked in the oven)and roast peppers.

El Cura also has a great selection of wines and local sherries to choose from. It was impossible to leave without a homemade chocolate dessert, a café bombon (coffee with condensed milk) and a peppermint tea.

Two of us ate and drank for around 22 Euros. This bar gets a sobresaliente (ten out of ten) from me for its original selection of tapas, taste and excellent value for money. The service is great and the professional dedication from the owner is amazing. As a family run business Bar El Cura closes on a Tuesday, so remember to choose another day if you want to go here.

Top tip  A tapa will give you a saucer size dish while a racion will give you a larger portion. Tapas vary in size from restaurant to restaurant. If you have never been to a particular restaurant before and you aren’t sure whether to order a tapa or a racion, start with a tapa to judge the size of their portions. Some tapas are extremely generous and are great for sharing, whilst in other places you will need to order a racion (a large portion roughly about a plateful) or media racion (half a portion ) for sharing. As tapas and raciones can be ordered as you go and don’t need to be ordered all at once, you can judge the size on your first order and take it from there.  Buen provecho – enjoy your meal!

* I have been to this restaurant more than once and I love it.  Every time both the food and service has been excellent. Bar El Cura had no idea that I am reviewing them and all opinions are my own (and of those who shared the meal with me!).

My big hairy avocado goal: setting goals and blogging

This week I spent a lovely morning at Bakesmiths in Bristol with business coach Linda Davies-Carr at her workshop on goals; Review Refresh Revive

When Linda first advertised this workshop as ‘a half way through the year review session’, I realised with a surprise that the year was almost half way through and I still hadn’t achieved many of my goals as a writer. It’s easy to go off track and get caught up in the other things going on life. So, I signed up for the workshop realising that this was an opportunity to recover my motivation.

One of the first things Linda asked us to do was complete a form with questions about our business. The first question asked if we have a business plan. As a retreat organiser, I have a business plan. However, as a writer I don’t have one. An ‘Aha moment’ came as I realised that I have not been paying attention to my writing goals. Actually, I wasn’t even sure what those goals were. So, it’s no wonder I don’t write as many blog posts as I’d like to; I am not taking myself seriously. I teach others to set goals using the wheel of life as part of wellbeing courses, but I clearly am not walking my talk in this area of my life.

So, why are goals important anyway?

Procrastination seems to be a popular word nowadays and ‘finding time to write’ is a common complaint among writers and business owners who write a blog. One of the great advantages of having a coach to help you set goals, is that you have someone you are accountable to. You set a goal with your coach, decide how best to achieve it, let your coach know what action you will take and then report back with your results. Not only do you not want to let your coach down, but you also feel motivated, so you get on and do it. Besides, it’s embarrassing telling your coach that you didn’t do it because the dog ate your notes, or whatever excuse we use. Setting goals helps to keep you going in the right direction. It gives you clarity. Your goals motivate you when you get stuck or can’t remember what you were supposed to be doing. They help you deal with overwhelm and create a strategy in your work.

The big hairy avocado goal

Linda talked about having a big hairy audacious goal (which I later misread as a big hairy avocado goal in my notes) and having smaller goals that you can tick off.

She suggested that we set thirty day, sixty day and ninety day goals as well as twelve month goals and five year goals. If you are thinking ‘I don’t have time for that’, Linda also pointed out that for every minute we spend planning, we later save ten minutes in execution.

The big hairy goal is usually the one you are working towards long-term. Whether that’s to own a boat and navigate the world, to write a book, to own a beautiful home, to set up a charity or to earn a five-figure income from your blog. It’s the dream-big one.

Take action

Linda repeated the importance of acting immediately. So, after the workshop I set about writing my goals as a writer. I’ve committed myself to writing two blog posts a week for my own blog, a guest post once a month for other blogs and to write two articles a month that I can sell. Each goal has a deadline, a list of things I can do to achieve it and three things that I can do to move me towards that goal. It was exciting to see my goals taking shape as I planned how to achieve them. I have also set myself a financial goal. And, of course a goal to write a business plan for my freelance writing career. Now I have posted this online, I also have to be accountable to you, lovely reader or, alternatively, find a blog-eating dog and attempt to deny all knowledge of any goals. In other words, it will now be hard to let you down. Not only do I feel motivated, but I’ve also made a commitment.

Make goal setting fun

Make it creative. Sit somewhere inspiring, get yourself a drink and plenty of water to keep hydrated, put on some music, create a vision board, use different colour pens, buy yourself a special notebook, use coloured paper, whatever makes it enjoyable for you. Find someone to help you gain clarity whether that’s a brainstorming session with a friend or a coaching session. Writing your goals down provides a visual reminder of what you need to do. Many experts believe that writing goals down has a powerful effect. Check out Brian Tracy to find out more. Make sure you can see your goals every day. Linda’s advice is “do something towards your goals every day to keep up your momentum”.

Now I’m accountable to you, dear reader

So, will goal setting as a travel and personal development blogger help me to take myself seriously? In other words, will I write more blog posts? I’m hoping you will be able to see for yourself by watching my blog grow week by week. I don’t want to let you or myself down, so I have set dates on my calendar for each goal that I have set myself. I also don’t want to let my personal coach down – she has worked hard with me to help me gain clarity and create a vision of where I want to be with my writing career. I have my goals written down in a pretty notebook – there’s one on each page and today I brainstormed where I want to be in five year’s time. I feel motivated and in the last few days I have been far more productive as I look at my goals and get to work on them. And guess what? It feels good.

I hope this article has been useful and would love to hear your comments in the box below.

How to order a coffee in Spain

How to drink coffee in Spain

20161228_105112If you have ever been to Spain and wondered what type of coffee to ask for, then this guide to ordering coffee that I came across recently is just for you.

Spanish coffee is strong and down to earth. You won’t find a menu with lattes or cappuccinos. So, whether you choose to drink it hot, with ice, decaf, with or without milk or very sweet with condensed milk, this guide will hep you decipher the lingo when it comes to ordering coffee in Spain.

If you prefer not to drink caffeine, you can order all the coffees in the guide with decaf coffee (descafeinado). So, a decaf coffee with condensed milk becomes ‘un descafeinado bombon’.

While the guide refers to a café manchado as either an espresso with a splash of milk or a ‘glass of milk flavoured with coffee’, I have always known it as the latter – hot milk with a splash of coffee. Coffees do vary from region to region though, so it’s worth checking.

If you are visiting Spain in summer, a café bombon con hielo (coffee with condensed milk and ice) is a great way to drink something cool if you don’t fancy an ice cream or would prefer a cool, but sweet alternative to a dessert after a meal.

One thing that is still not common everywhere in Spain (although Madrid may be different) is soy or other alternatives to dairy milk. However, lactose-free milk is generally on offer in most coffee shops, restaurants and bars.

Don’t be surprised if your coffee served in a glass in Spain, but one thing you will rarely find (and let’s hope it stays that way) is coffee served in a plastic or polystyrene disposable cup therefore, making coffee drinking an environmentally-friendly affair as well as a sociable one.  As the guide to ordering coffee says “the last thing to note is that most Spaniards do not take their coffees ‘to go’. Instead, they sit down to enjoy their drinks with friends or family”.

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